How to triage bugs in the Debian bug tracking system

Triaging bugs is one of the easiest way to start contributing to Debian. I’ll teach you the basics in this article.

1. Prerequisites

All interactions with the Debian Bug Tracking System (BTS) happen through email so you need to have an email account with an address that you’re willing to make public.

All the mail that you send to the BTS will be archived and publicly available through its web-interface. This also means that you should have some spam filters in place because it will inevitably be harvested by spammers. :-(

To ensure that this email address is consistently used by the various tools that we’re going to use, it’s a good idea to put this email address in the DEBEMAIL environment variable. You can also specify your full name in DEBFULLNAME (in case you don’t want to use the name associated with your Unix account). You usually do this by modifying ~/.bashrc (if you use bash as login shell):

export DEBEMAIL="hertzog@debian.org"
export DEBFULLNAME="Raphaël Hertzog"

You should also install the devscripts package, it provides the bts command that we’re going to use.

2. Find a package or a team with too many bugs

You can literally pick any popular software that’s in Debian, they almost always get more bug reports than the maintainers can handle. Instead of picking a package, you can also select a packaging team and concentrate your efforts on the set of packages managed by the team.

In any case, it’s important to receive the bug traffic for the packages that you’re going to work on. If you went for a specific package, you should subscribe to the package via the Package Tracking System (there’s a subscribe box on the bottom left corner once you selected the source package of interest). If you decided to help a team, there’s usually a dedicated mailing list receiving all bug traffic.

You can browse a list of packages with the most bugs if you have troubles finding a package to work on.

A stack of bug reports to triage

3. Triage bugs!

Bug triaging is all about making sure that bugs are correctly classified so that when a developer looks at the bug list, he can quickly find bugs with all the information required to be able to fix them!

3.1 Adding information to bug

Adding supplementary information is easily done just by sending a mail to XXXX@bugs.debian.org (replace XXXX with the bug number).

But often you want to reply to a message in the bug history, in that case “bts --mbox show XXXX” is for you. It will grab the corresponding mailbox and open a mailer (mutt by default) on it. Now you can directly reply in your favorite mailer.

3.2 Classifying bugs

The Debian BTS uses tags (click the link and read the doc!) to classify bugs. “bts tag XXXX + foo” will add the foo tag (replace the + with a – to remove a tag). If you want to explain why you’re adding a tag, you should instead reply in the bug log as explained above, put control@bugs.debian.org in Bcc (Blind Carbon Copy) and start the body of your message with your tag command:

tag XXXX + foo
thanks

But what tag should you add? When a bug is submitted, you should try to reproduce the bug. If you can reproduce it, then tag the bug “confirmed” (example in #641710). If you can’t, you should request more information (ex: a sample document triggering the bug, a configuration file, the output of some relevant command, etc.) until you can reproduce it or conclude that it was a user mistake. When you request supplementary information due to this, you should tag the bug “unreproducible moreinfo” (example in #526774). “moreinfo” should be later dropped when the requested information are provided, and “unreproducible” should be dropped if those information were enough to actually help reproduce the bug (example in #526774).

During that initial evaluation, it’s also worth differentiating packaging bugs (which are specific to Debian) from upstream bugs (which are relevant also for non-Debian users). The latter should be tagged “upstream” (and forwarded upstream if the bug is reproducible or contains enough information for the upstream developers, example in #635112).

If you saw a (viable) patch in the bug log, the bug should be tagged “patch”. This is usually done by the patch submitter but sometimes it’s forgotten (example in #632460). Take care though to not reinstate the patch tag if it was initially set but then dropped by the package maintainer after a review of the patch.

If the title of the bug report is not descriptive enough, you can change it with a “retitle XXXX new-title” command (example in #170850).

You can also change the severity of the bug report depending on the impact of the problem (with a command “severity XXXX new-severity”, what a surprise!). Request for new features are “wishlist”, most documentation problems are “minor”. On the other side of the scale, you can use “important” for bugs that are very annoying but that should not block a release. “serious”, “grave” and “critical” are used for release critical bugs, check the official definitions of the severities (examples in 502738 or #506498).

3.3 Closing non-bugs and bugs that are already fixed

If your analysis of the bug report is that it’s not really a bug but a user mistake, then you should close it by sending a mail to XXXX-done@bugs.debian.org with some explanations of the user’s mistake so that he can get past his problem (example in #592853).

If the problem was a real bug, but one that is apparently already fixed, you should try to quickly find the version that fixed the bug. If you can’t find it in the changelog (there’s a link to it in the PTS, or you can use /usr/share/doc/package/changelog.Debian.gz), you’ll make the safe assumption that the upstream version you’re currently using is the first one where this is fixed. Then you send a mail to XXXX-done@bugs.debian.org but you start your mail with “Version: version-that-fixed-the-bug” and continue with a small explanation of why you believe the bug to be fixed by this version (example in #122948).

3.4 Reassigning misfiled bug reports

Bug reports are not always filed against the proper package. Users file bugs against applications where they experience the bugs, but the real bug might be in an underlying library or application.

When that happens, you should use the “reassign XXXX correct-package version” command to get it filed against the correct package. The version parameter is optional but should be provided if possible, it should be the oldest version that we know to have the problem (example in #626232).

3.5 Forwarding bugs

Forwarding bugs means opening bug reports in the upstream bug tracker for issues that have been reported in Debian but that applies to the upstream (unmodified) source code. Be sure to include all the relevant information and a link to the corresponding Debian bug.

Depending on the upstream bug tracker, you might have to open an account to be able to file new bug reports.

On the Debian side, you must record that a bug has been forwarded with “bts forwarded XXXX upstream-bug-url”. upstream-bug-url is the URL corresponding to the upstream bug report you created (ex: http://projects.ciarang.com/p/feed2omb/issues/21/ recorded in #609345″).

If the upstream authors fix the bug you reported, you can tag the Debian bug with “fixed-upstream” so that it’s easier to find bugs to close when the next upstream release comes out (example in #637275).

3.6 Updating version information

The Debian BTS uses “version tracking” to know which package versions are affected by a given bug. It’s particularly important to have correct version information for release critical bugs since it might affect the migration of packages to testing.

You can learn more on this topic here: http://wiki.debian.org/HowtoUseBTS.

4. More advice

Colin Watson wrote a constructive rant explaining some mistakes that bug triagers are often doing. While it refers mainly to Ubuntu’s launchpad, the advice apply equally as well to Debian. Check it out to become a better bug triager!

Note that you can refer to this article with this shorter URL: http://raphaelhertzog.com/go/bugtriaging/

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How to prepare patches for Debian packages

You want to start contributing to Debian and/or Ubuntu, you decided to help a package maintainer and you’re now looking for how to change a source package and how to submit your changes.

1. Retrieve the source package and install build-dependencies

The first step is to retrieve the latest version of the source package and to install the required build-dependencies. I already covered how to do this with apt-get in the article explaining how to rebuild a source package.

If you prefer, you can use dget (from the devscripts package) to directly grab the source package. You can find the URL of the .dsc files in the Package Tracking System for example.

Sometimes apt-get will warn you that the source package is maintained in a VCS repository, like this:

$ apt-get source wordpress
[...]
NOTICE: 'wordpress' packaging is maintained in the 'Git' version control system at:
git://git.debian.org/git/collab-maint/wordpress.git
[...]

In that case, you can use debcheckout to retrieve the VCS repository instead (provided that you have the corresponding VCS installed):

$ debcheckout wordpress
declared git repository at git://git.debian.org/git/collab-maint/wordpress.git
git clone git://git.debian.org/git/collab-maint/wordpress.git wordpress ...
Cloning into wordpress...

Note however that some maintainers use their VCS in a way that’s not really compatible with the explanations that I will give below.

It’s also a good idea to install the package “packaging-dev”. It’s a meta-package depending on the most common tools that are used for Debian packaging work.

2. Do the changes

Execute dch --nmu to record the fact that you’re working on an update prepared by someone who is not the maintainer (NMU means Non Maintainer Upload). This also ensures that if we build the package, we won’t overwrite the original source package that we downloaded, thus making it possible to generate a “diff” between both versions.

2.1. Modify Debian packaging files

Now fire your text editor and do the required changes in the “debian” sub-directory. You will probably run dch -a multiple times to document each subsequent change.

2.2. Modify upstream files

If you have to modify upstream files, the proper way to do it depends on the source package format (“1.0″ vs “3.0 (quilt)” vs “3.0 (native)”, see the debian/source/format file) and on the presence or not of a patch system (the what-patch can help you identify it). In this explanation, I’ll assume that the package is using the recommended format: “3.0 (quilt)”. (It also works for “1.0” if quilt is used and if you configured ~/.quiltrc as recommended by /usr/share/doc/quilt/README.source).

First you should ensure that all patches have been applied with quilt push -a. If there’s no patch yet, you want to create the debian/patches directory (with mkdir debian/patches). Note that you should better invoke quilt from the root of the source package (and the examples below assume this).

2.2.1. Import a patch

If the upstream changes are already in a patch file (say /tmp/patch that you downloaded from the upstream VCS repository) you can import that patch like this:

$ quilt import -P fix-foobar.patch /tmp/patch
Importing patch /tmp/patch (stored as fix-foobar.patch)
$ quilt push
Applying patch fix-foobar.patch
[...]
Now at patch fix-foobar.patch

The -P option allows to select the name of the patch file created in debian/patches/. As you see, the new patch file is recorded in debian/patches/series but not applied by default, we’re thus doing it with quilt push.

2.2.1. Create a new patch

If the upstream changes that you want to make are not in a patch yet, you should tell quilt that you’re going to create one:

$ quilt new fix-foobar.patch
Patch fix-foobar.patch is now on top

Then you must record every file that you’re going to modify with a quilt add invocation. quilt then makes a backup of those files so that it can generate the patch later on. If you’re going to modify the files with your text editor you can just do quilt edit file-to-modify, it’s the same than quilt add file-to-modify followed by sensible-editor file-to-modify.

$ quilt edit foobar.c
File foobar.c added to patch fix-foobar.patch

The last step is tell quilt to generate the patch:

$ quilt refresh
Refreshed patch fix-foobar.patch

3. Test your changes

You should build your modified package with “debuild -us -uc”. You can easily install the resulting package with “debi”. Verify that everything works as expected. If not, continue your modifications until you’re satisfied with the result.

4. Generate a patch and mail it

If you followed the instructions, you should have two .dsc files in the parent directory, like this:

$ cd ..
$ ls wordpress_*.dsc
../wordpress_3.0.5+dfsg-1.1.dsc
../wordpress_3.0.5+dfsg-1.dsc

Generating the patch to send to the maintainer is then just a matter of running debdiff:

$ debdiff wordpress_3.0.5+dfsg-1.dsc wordpress_3.0.5+dfsg-1.1.dsc >/tmp/wp-debdiff

You can send the /tmp/wp-debdiff file to the wordpress maintainer. Usually you send it via the bugreport that your update is fixing and you add the “patch” tag to the report.

This can be automated with the nmudiff utility. By default it assumes that you’re using mutt but it can also directly feed the resulting mail to sendmail. The default text that nmudiff proposes assumes that you’re actually performing an NMU and that the result has been uploaded. If that’s not the case, you should edit the text and make it clear that you’re just sending a patch.

If you have been working in a VCS repository, instead of using debdiff you can simply use the diff feature integrated in your VCS (git diff, svn diff, etc.). But note that with a distributed VCS (like git/bzr/mercurial, unlike svn) you should probably have committed all individual changes in separate changesets. And instead of sending a single patch, you’re probably going to send a series of patches (though it might be easier to just upload your branch in a public repository and give the corresponding URL to the maintainer).

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Howto to rebuild Debian packages

Being able to rebuild an existing Debian package is a very useful skill. It’s a prerequisite for many tasks that an admin might want to perform at some point: enable a feature that is disabled in the official Debian package, rebuild a source package for another suite (for example build a Debian Testing package for use on Debian Stable, we call that backporting), include a bug fix that upstream developers prepared, etc. Discover the 4 steps to rebuild a Debian package.

1. Download the source package

The preferred way to download source packages is to use APT. It can download them from the source repositories that you have configured in /etc/apt/sources.list, for example:

deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian unstable main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian testing main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian stable main contrib non-free

Note that the lines start with “deb-src” instead of the usual “deb”. This tells APT that we are interested in the source packages and not in the binary packages.

After an apt-get update you can use apt-get source publican to retrieve the latest version of the source package “publican”. You can also indicate the distribution where the source package must be fetched with the syntax “package/distribution“. apt-get source publican/testing will grab the source package publican in the testing distribution and extract it in the current directory (with dpkg-source -x, thus you need to have installed the dpkg-dev package).

$ apt-get source publican/testing
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
NOTICE: 'publican' packaging is maintained in the 'Git' version control system at:
git://git.debian.org/collab-maint/publican.git
Need to get 727 kB of source archives.
Get:1 http://nas/debian/ squeeze/main publican 2.1-2 (dsc) [2253 B]
Get:2 http://nas/debian/ squeeze/main publican 2.1-2 (tar) [720 kB]
Get:3 http://nas/debian/ squeeze/main publican 2.1-2 (diff) [4728 B]
Fetched 727 kB in 0s (2970 kB/s)  
dpkg-source: info: extracting publican in publican-2.1
dpkg-source: info: unpacking publican_2.1.orig.tar.gz
dpkg-source: info: unpacking publican_2.1-2.debian.tar.gz
$ ls -dF publican*
publican-2.1/                 publican_2.1-2.dsc
publican_2.1-2.debian.tar.gz  publican_2.1.orig.tar.gz

If you don’t want to use APT, or if the source package is not hosted in an APT source repository, you can download a complete source package with dget -u dsc-url where dsc-url is the URL of the .dsc file representing the source package. dget is provided by the devscripts package. Note that the -u option means that the origin of the source package is not verified before extraction.

2. Install the build-dependencies

Again APT can do the grunt work for you, you just have to use apt-get build-dep foo to install the build-dependencies for the last version of the source package foo. It supports the same syntactic sugar than apt-get source so that you can run apt-get build-dep publican/testing to install the build-dependencies required to build the testing version of the publican source package.

If you can’t use APT for this, enter the directory where the source package has been unpacked and run dpkg-checkbuilddeps. It will spit out a list of unmet build dependencies (if there are any, otherwise it will print nothing and you can go ahead safely). With a bit of copy and paste and a “apt-get install” invocation, you’ll install the required packages in a few seconds.

3. Do whatever changes you need

I won’t detail this step since it depends on your specific goal with the rebuild. You might have to edit debian/rules, or to apply a patch.

But one thing is sure, if you have made any change or have recompiled the package in a different environment, you should really change its version number. You can do this with “dch --local foo” (again from the devscripts package), replace “foo” by a short name identifying you as the supplier of the updated version. It will update debian/changelog and invite you to write a small entry documenting your change.

4. Build the package

The last step is also the simplest one now that everything is in place. You must be in the directory of the unpacked source package.
Now run either “debuild -us -uc” (recommended, requires the devscripts package) or directly “dpkg-buildpackage -us -uc”. The “-us -uc” options avoid the signature step in the build process that would generate a (harmless) failure at the end if you have no GPG key matching the name entered in the top entry of the Debian changelog.

$ cd publican-2.1
$ debuild -us -uc
 dpkg-buildpackage -rfakeroot -D -us -uc
dpkg-buildpackage: export CFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): -g -O2
dpkg-buildpackage: export CPPFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): 
dpkg-buildpackage: export CXXFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): -g -O2
dpkg-buildpackage: export FFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): -g -O2
dpkg-buildpackage: export LDFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): 
dpkg-buildpackage: source package publican
dpkg-buildpackage: source version 2.1-2rh1
dpkg-buildpackage: source changed by Raphaël Hertzog 
 dpkg-source --before-build publican-2.1
dpkg-buildpackage: host architecture i386
[...]
dpkg-deb: building package `publican' in `../publican_2.1-2rh1_all.deb'.
 dpkg-genchanges  >../publican_2.1-2rh1_i386.changes
dpkg-genchanges: not including original source code in upload
 dpkg-source --after-build publican-2.1
dpkg-buildpackage: binary and diff upload (original source NOT included)
Now running lintian...
Finished running lintian.

The build is over, the updated source and binary packages have been generated in the parent directory.

$ cd ..
$ ls -dF publican*
publican-2.1/                    publican_2.1-2rh1.dsc
publican_2.1-2.debian.tar.gz     publican_2.1-2rh1_i386.changes
publican_2.1-2.dsc               publican_2.1-2rh1_source.changes
publican_2.1-2rh1_all.deb        publican_2.1.orig.tar.gz
publican_2.1-2rh1.debian.tar.gz

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