3 ways to not clutter your Debian source package with autogenerated files

It’s quite common that the upstream build system generates/updates some files but does not clean them up properly when you call make clean. In that case, when you rebuild the package a second time in the same tree, the generated Debian source package will contain those changes.

You usually don’t want those changes. They make your package harder to review because they contain unneeded modifications (either directly in the .diff.gz with the old source format, or in a new patch in debian/patches/debian-changes-<ver> with the “3.0 (quilt)” source format).

I’ll show you 3 ways to avoid this problem. They are all workarounds, the proper fix would be to improve the upstream build system to really clean up the generated files. This is usually possible for files that are “created”, but it’s much more cumbersome for files that are “updated” (you would have to keep a backup of the original file so that you can restore it).

The traditional fix

Instead of relying on the upstream build system to do the work, we modify the clean target in debian/rules to remove the files that are left-over. Since “debian/rules clean” is always called before a source package is built, those generated files are not included as changes compared to what upstream provided.

A common work-around: always build from a clean state

As you have noted, the problem only happens when you build (source and binaries) twice in a row in the same tree. Some VCS-helper tools always build the Debian package in a temporary tree which is exported from the VCS. This is the case of svn-buildpackage by default and of git-buildpackage if you use its --git-export-dir option.

I don’t like this solution because it solves the problem only for the maintainer. Anyone else who is working on top of the package without using the same VCS-helper tool would be affected by the problem.

A new way to avoid the problem

Since it’s now possible to store dpkg-source options in the source package itself, we can conveniently have everybody use the --extend-diff-ignore option. It tells dpkg-source to ignore some files when checking whether we have made changes to upstream files.

For example if you want to ignore changes made on the files “config.sub”, “config.guess” and “Makefile” you could put this in debian/source/options:

# Don't store changes on autogenerated files
extend-diff-ignore = "(^|/)(config\.sub|config\.guess|Makefile)$"

You need to know a bit about Perl regular expressions since that’s what is used by dpkg-source to match the filenames to exclude.

Note that this approach always works, even when you can’t remove the file. So it saves you having to make a backup of the unmodified file just to be able to restore it before the next build.

Found it useful? Be sure to not miss other packaging tips (or lessons), click here to subscribe to my free newsletter and get new articles by email.

Avoid a newbie packager mistake: don’t build your Debian packages with dpkg -b

In the last years, I have seen many people try to use dpkg --build to create Debian packages. Indeed, if you look up dpkg’s and dpkg-deb‘s manual pages, this option seems to be what you have to use:

-b, --build directory [archive|directory]

Creates a debian archive from the filesystem tree stored in directory. directory must have a DEBIAN subdirectory, which contains the control information files such as the control file itself. This directory will not appear in the binary package’s filesystem archive, but instead the files in it will be put in the binary package’s control information area.

And indeed, dpkg-deb is what ultimately creates the .deb files (aka binary packages). But it’s a low-level tool that you should not call yourself. If you want to properly package a new software, you should rather create a Debian source package that will transform upstream source code into policy-compliant binary packages.

Creating a source package also involves preparing a directory tree (but with a “debian” sub-directory), it’s probably more complicated than calling dpkg -b on a manually crafted directory. But the result is much more versatile: the tools used bring value by dynamically analyzing/modifying the files within your package (for example, the dependencies on C libraries that your package needs are automatically inserted).

If this is news to you, you might want to check out the New Maintainers’ Guide and the Debian Policy.

Found it useful? Be sure to not miss other packaging tips (or lessons), click here to subscribe to my free newsletter and get new articles by email.

Howto to rebuild Debian packages

Being able to rebuild an existing Debian package is a very useful skill. It’s a prerequisite for many tasks that an admin might want to perform at some point: enable a feature that is disabled in the official Debian package, rebuild a source package for another suite (for example build a Debian Testing package for use on Debian Stable, we call that backporting), include a bug fix that upstream developers prepared, etc. Discover the 4 steps to rebuild a Debian package.

1. Download the source package

The preferred way to download source packages is to use APT. It can download them from the source repositories that you have configured in /etc/apt/sources.list, for example:

deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian unstable main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian testing main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian stable main contrib non-free

Note that the lines start with “deb-src” instead of the usual “deb”. This tells APT that we are interested in the source packages and not in the binary packages.

After an apt-get update you can use apt-get source publican to retrieve the latest version of the source package “publican”. You can also indicate the distribution where the source package must be fetched with the syntax “package/distribution“. apt-get source publican/testing will grab the source package publican in the testing distribution and extract it in the current directory (with dpkg-source -x, thus you need to have installed the dpkg-dev package).

$ apt-get source publican/testing
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
NOTICE: 'publican' packaging is maintained in the 'Git' version control system at:
git://git.debian.org/collab-maint/publican.git
Need to get 727 kB of source archives.
Get:1 http://nas/debian/ squeeze/main publican 2.1-2 (dsc) [2253 B]
Get:2 http://nas/debian/ squeeze/main publican 2.1-2 (tar) [720 kB]
Get:3 http://nas/debian/ squeeze/main publican 2.1-2 (diff) [4728 B]
Fetched 727 kB in 0s (2970 kB/s)  
dpkg-source: info: extracting publican in publican-2.1
dpkg-source: info: unpacking publican_2.1.orig.tar.gz
dpkg-source: info: unpacking publican_2.1-2.debian.tar.gz
$ ls -dF publican*
publican-2.1/                 publican_2.1-2.dsc
publican_2.1-2.debian.tar.gz  publican_2.1.orig.tar.gz

If you don’t want to use APT, or if the source package is not hosted in an APT source repository, you can download a complete source package with dget -u dsc-url where dsc-url is the URL of the .dsc file representing the source package. dget is provided by the devscripts package. Note that the -u option means that the origin of the source package is not verified before extraction.

2. Install the build-dependencies

Again APT can do the grunt work for you, you just have to use apt-get build-dep foo to install the build-dependencies for the last version of the source package foo. It supports the same syntactic sugar than apt-get source so that you can run apt-get build-dep publican/testing to install the build-dependencies required to build the testing version of the publican source package.

If you can’t use APT for this, enter the directory where the source package has been unpacked and run dpkg-checkbuilddeps. It will spit out a list of unmet build dependencies (if there are any, otherwise it will print nothing and you can go ahead safely). With a bit of copy and paste and a “apt-get install” invocation, you’ll install the required packages in a few seconds.

3. Do whatever changes you need

I won’t detail this step since it depends on your specific goal with the rebuild. You might have to edit debian/rules, or to apply a patch.

But one thing is sure, if you have made any change or have recompiled the package in a different environment, you should really change its version number. You can do this with “dch --local foo” (again from the devscripts package), replace “foo” by a short name identifying you as the supplier of the updated version. It will update debian/changelog and invite you to write a small entry documenting your change.

4. Build the package

The last step is also the simplest one now that everything is in place. You must be in the directory of the unpacked source package.
Now run either “debuild -us -uc” (recommended, requires the devscripts package) or directly “dpkg-buildpackage -us -uc”. The “-us -uc” options avoid the signature step in the build process that would generate a (harmless) failure at the end if you have no GPG key matching the name entered in the top entry of the Debian changelog.

$ cd publican-2.1
$ debuild -us -uc
 dpkg-buildpackage -rfakeroot -D -us -uc
dpkg-buildpackage: export CFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): -g -O2
dpkg-buildpackage: export CPPFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): 
dpkg-buildpackage: export CXXFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): -g -O2
dpkg-buildpackage: export FFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): -g -O2
dpkg-buildpackage: export LDFLAGS from dpkg-buildflags (origin: vendor): 
dpkg-buildpackage: source package publican
dpkg-buildpackage: source version 2.1-2rh1
dpkg-buildpackage: source changed by Raphaël Hertzog 
 dpkg-source --before-build publican-2.1
dpkg-buildpackage: host architecture i386
[...]
dpkg-deb: building package `publican' in `../publican_2.1-2rh1_all.deb'.
 dpkg-genchanges  >../publican_2.1-2rh1_i386.changes
dpkg-genchanges: not including original source code in upload
 dpkg-source --after-build publican-2.1
dpkg-buildpackage: binary and diff upload (original source NOT included)
Now running lintian...
Finished running lintian.

The build is over, the updated source and binary packages have been generated in the parent directory.

$ cd ..
$ ls -dF publican*
publican-2.1/                    publican_2.1-2rh1.dsc
publican_2.1-2.debian.tar.gz     publican_2.1-2rh1_i386.changes
publican_2.1-2.dsc               publican_2.1-2rh1_source.changes
publican_2.1-2rh1_all.deb        publican_2.1.orig.tar.gz
publican_2.1-2rh1.debian.tar.gz

Do you want to read more tutorials like this one? Click here to subscribe to my free newsletter, you can opt to receive future articles by email.

4 tips to maintain a “3.0 (quilt)” Debian source package in a VCS

Most Debian packages are managed with a version control system (VCS) like git, subversion, bazaar or mercurial. The particularities of the 3.0 (quilt) source format are not without consequences in terms of integration with the VCS. I’ll give you some tips to have a smoother experience.

All the samples given in the article assume that you use git as version control system.

1. Add .pc to the VCS ignore list

.pc is the directory used by quilt to store its internal data (list of applied patches, backup of modified files). It’s also created by dpkg-source so that quilt knows that the patches are in debian/patches (and not in patches which is the default directory used by quilt). For that reason, the directory is kept even if you unapply all the patches.

However you don’t want to store this directory in your repository, so it’s best to put it in the VCS ignore list. With git you simply do:

$ echo ".pc" >>.gitignore
$ git add .gitignore
$ git commit -m "Ignore quilt dir"

The .gitignore file is ignored by dpkg-source, so you’re not adding any noise to the generated source package.

2. Unapply patches after the build

If you store upstream sources with non-applied patches (most people do), and if you don’t build packages in a temporary build directory, then you probably want to unapply the patches after the build so that your repository is again in a clean status.

This is now the default since dpkg-source will unapply any patch that it had to apply by itself. Thus if you start the build with a clean tree, you’ll end up with a clean tree.

But you can still force dpkg-source to unapply patches by adding “unapply-patches” to debian/source/local-options:

$ echo "unapply-patches" >>debian/source/local-options
$ git add debian/source/local-options
$ git commit -m "Unapply patches after build"

svn-buildpackage always builds in a temporary directory so the repository is left exactly like it was before the build, this option is thus useless. git-buildpackage can also be told to build in a temporary directory with --git-export-dir=../build-area/ (the directory ../build-area/ is the one used by svn-buildpackage, so this option makes git-buildpackage behave like svn-buildpackage in that respect).

3. Manage your quilt patches as a git branch

Instead of using quilt to manage the Debian-specific patches, it’s possible to use git itself. git-buildpackage comes with gbp-pq (“Git-BuildPackage Patch Queue”): it can export the quilt serie in a git branch that you can manipulate like you want. Each commit represents a patch, so you want to rebase that branch to edit intermediary commits. Check out the upstream documentation of this tool to learn how to work with it.

There’s an alternative tool as well: git-dpm. Its website explains the principle very well. It’s a more complicated than gbp-pq but it has the advantage of keeping the history of all branches used to generate the quilt series of all Debian releases. You might want to read a review made by Sam Hartman, it explains the limits of this tool.

4. Document how to review the changes

One of the main benefit of this new source format is that it’s easy to review changes because upstream changes are kept as separate patches properly documented (ideally using the DEP-3 format). With the tools above, the commit message becomes the patch header. Thus it’s important to write meaningful commit messages.

This works well as long as your workflow considers the Debian patches as a branch that you rebase on top of the upstream sources at each release. Some maintainers don’t like this workflow and prefer to have the Debian changes applied directly in the packaging branch. They switch to a new upstream version by merging it in their packaging branch. In that case, it’s difficult to generate a quilt serie out of the VCS. Instead, you should instruct dpkg-source to store all the changes in a single patch (which is then similar to the good old .diff.gz) and document in the header of that patch how the changes can be better reviewed, for example in the VCS web interface. You do the former with the --single-debian-patch option and the latter by writing the header in debian/source/patch-header:

$ echo "single-debian-patch" >> debian/source/local-options
$ cat >debian/source/patch-header <<END
This patch contains all the Debian-specific
changes mixed together. To review them
separately, please inspect the VCS history
at http://git.debian.org/?=collab-maint/foo.git

END

Subscribe to this blog by RSS, by email or on Facebook.

Managing distribution-specific patches with a common source package

In the comments of the article explaining how to generate different dependencies on Debian and Ubuntu with a common source package, I got asked if it was possible to apply a patch only in some distribution. And indeed it is.

The source package format 3.0 (quilt) has a neat feature for this. Instead of unconditionally using debian/patches/series to look up patches, dpkg-source first tries to use debian/patches/vendor.series (where vendor is ubuntu, debian, etc.). Note that dpkg-source does not stack patches from multiple series file, it uses a single series file, the first that exists.

So what’s the best way to use this? Debian should always provide debian/patches/series, they are supposed to provide the default set of patches to use. Any derivative cooperating with Debian can maintain their own series files within the common VCS repository used for package maintenance. They can drop Debian-specific patches (say branding patches for example), and they can add their own on top of the remaining Debian patches.

It’s worth noting that it’s the job of the maintainers to keep both series files in sync when needed. dpkg-source offers no way to have stacked series files (or dependencies between them).

If you want to use quilt to edit an alternate series file, you can temporarily set the QUILT_SERIES environment variable to “vendor.series”. Just make sure to start from a clean state, i.e. no patches applied. Otherwise quilt will be confused by the sudden mismatch between the series file and its internal data (stored in the .pc directory).

Found it useful? Click here to see how you can encourage me to provide more articles like this one.

Correctly renaming a conffile in Debian package maintainer scripts

After having dealt with the removal of obsolete conffiles, I’ll now explain what you should do when a configuration file managed by dpkg must be renamed.

The problem

Let’s suppose that version 1.2 of the software stopped providing /etc/foo.conf. Instead it provides /etc/bar.conf because the configuration file got renamed. If you do nothing special, the new conffile will be installed with the default configuration, and the old one will stay around. Any customization made by the administrator are lost in the process (in fact they are not lost, they are still in foo.conf but they are unused).

Of course, you could do mv /etc/foo.conf /etc/bar.conf in the pre-installation script. But that’s not satisfactory: it will generate a spurious conffile prompt that the end-user will not understand.

The solution

In the preinst script, you have to verify if the old conffile has been modified by the administrator. If yes, you want to keep the file around. Otherwise you know you will be able to ditch it once the upgrade is over, and you rename it to /etc/foo.conf.dpkg-remove to remember this fact.

In the postinst script, you remove /etc/foo.conf.dpkg-remove. If the old conffile (/etc/foo.conf) still exists, it’s because it was modified by the administrator. You make a backup of the new conffile in /etc/bar.conf.dpkg-dist and rename the old one into /etc/bar.conf.

In the postrm, when called to abort an upgrade, you move /etc/foo.conf.dpkg-remove back to its original name.

In practice, use dpkg-maintscript-helper

dpkg-maintscript-helper can automate all those tasks. You just have to put the following snippet in the maintainer scripts (postinst, postrm, preinst):

if dpkg-maintscript-helper supports mv_conffile 2>/dev/null; then
    dpkg-maintscript-helper mv_conffile /etc/foo.conf /etc/bar.conf 1.1-3 -- "$@"
fi

In this example, I assumed that version 1.1-3 was the last version of the package that contained /etc/foo.conf (i.e. the last version released before 1.2-1 was packaged).

You can avoid the preliminary test if you pre-depend on “dpkg (>= 1.15.7.2)” or if enough time has passed to assume that everybody has a newer version anyway. You can learn all the details in dpkg-maintscript-helper’s manual page.

Found it useful? Be sure to not miss other packaging tips (or lessons), click here to subscribe to my free newsletter and get new articles by email (just check “Send me blog updates”).

The right way to remove an obsolete conffile in a Debian package

A conffile is a configuration file managed by dpkg, I’m sure you remember the introductory article about conffiles. When your package stops providing a conffile, the file stays on disk and it’s recorded as obsolete by the package manager. It’s only removed during purge. If you want the file to go away, you have to remove it yourself within your package’s configuration scripts. You will now learn how to do this right.

When is that needed?

dpkg errs on the side of safety by not removing the file until purge but in most cases it’s best to remove it sooner so as to not confuse the user. In some cases, it’s even required because keeping the file could break the software (for example if the file is in a .d configuration directory, and if it contains directives that are either no longer supported by the new version or in conflict with other new configuration files).

What’s complicated in “rm”?

So you want to remove the conffile. Adding an “rm” command in debian/postinst sounds easy. Except it’s not the right thing to do. The conffile might contain customizations made by the administrator and you don’t want to wipe those. Instead you want to keep the file around so that he can get his changes back and do whatever is required with those.

The correct action is thus to move the file away in the prerm, to ensure it doesn’t disturb the new version. At the same time, you need to verify whether the conffile has been modified by the administrator and remember it for later. In the postinst, you need to remove the file if it’s unmodified, or keep it under a different name that doesn’t interfere with the software. In many cases adding a simple .dpkg-bak suffix is enough. For instance, run-parts ignore files that contain a dot, and many other software are configured to only include files with a certain extension—say *.conf. In the postrm, you have to remove the obsolete conffiles that were kept due to local changes and you should also restore the original conffile in case the upgrade obsoleting the conffile is aborted.

Automating everything with dpkg-maintscript-helper

Phewww… that’s a lot of things to do for a seemingly simple task. Fortunately everything can be automated with dpkg-maintscript-helper. Let’s assume you want to remove /etc/foo/conf.d/bar because it’s obsolete and you’re going to prepare a new version 1.2-1 with the appropriate code to remove the file on upgrade. You just have to put this snippet in the 3 relevant scripts (preinst, postinst, postrm):

if dpkg-maintscript-helper supports rm_conffile 2>/dev/null; then
    dpkg-maintscript-helper rm_conffile /etc/foo/conf.d/bar 1.2-1 -- "$@"
fi

You can avoid the preliminary test if you pre-depend on “dpkg (>= 1.15.7.2)” or if enough time has passed to assume that everybody has a newer version anyway. You can learn all the details in dpkg-maintscript-helper’s manual page.

I hope you found this article helpful. You can follow me on Identi.ca, Twitter and Facebook.

How to generate different dependencies on Debian and Ubuntu with a common source package

There are situations in which a given package needs to have different dependencies in Debian and in Ubuntu. Despite this difference it’s possible to keep a single source package that will build both variants of the package. Continue reading to discover a step-by-step explanation.

1. When is that needed?

While it is possible to have different dependencies depending on the distribution on which the package is built, it should be usually avoided when possible. This infrastructure should only be used as a last resort when there are no better alternatives.

Here are some examples of when it might be needed:

  • Ubuntu has some packages that Debian does not have (or vice-versa), and the resulting package would benefit from having them installed.
  • The package names differ between Ubuntu and Debian and it’s on purpose (i.e. the difference is a justified choice and not a mistake because both distributions failed to coordinate).
  • The packages are built differently in both distributions, and the run time dependencies are not the same due to this. Maybe some associated patches are only applied in Ubuntu.

2. Using substitution variables in debian/control

The dependency that varies between both distributions can’t be hardcoded in debian/control, instead you should put a substitution variable (substvar) that will be replaced at build time by dpkg-gencontrol. You can name it ${dist:Depends} for example:

[...]
Depends: bzip2, ${shlibs:Depends}, ${misc:Depends}, ${dist:Depends}
[...]

Note that you typically already have other substitution variables (${shlibs:Depends} comes from dpkg-shlibdeps and ${misc:Depends} from debhelper and its dh_* scripts).

3. dpkg-gencontrol needs a -V option

The value used to replace this new variable needs to be communicated to dpkg-gencontrol. You can use the -V option for this, the syntax would be something like this:

dpkg-gencontrol [...] -Vdist:Depends="foo (>= 2), bar"

If you use debhelper, you have to pass the option to dh_gencontrol after two dashes (--):

dh_gencontrol -- -Vdist:Depends="foo (>= 2), bar"

If you use CDBS, you can set the DEB_DH_GENCONTROL_ARGS_ALL make variable:

include /usr/share/cdbs/1/rules/debhelper.mk
DEB_DH_GENCONTROL_ARGS_ALL = -- -Vdist:Depends="foo (>= 2), bar"

The value given to dpkg-gencontrol is static in all those examples, now let’s see how we can use give a different value depending on the distribution that we’re targetting.

4. Using dpkg-vendor in debian/rules

dpkg-vendor is a small tool (provided by the dpkg-dev package) that parses the /etc/dpkg/origins/default file (provided by the base-files package) to know the current distribution and its ancestry. It can be used in debian/rules to adjust the behavior depending on the current distribution. You can check its man-page to learn about the various options supported but we’re only going to use --derives-from <vendor> in this sample. With this option the script exits with zero if the current distribution is or derives from the indicated distribution, or with 1 otherwise.

Now combining all together, we can use dpkg-vendor to dynamically define the content of the substitution variable in debian/rules. Let’s suppose that you want ${dist:Depends} to be “foo (>= 2)” on Ubuntu (and its derivatives) and “bar” everywhere else. Using debhelper’s 7 tiny rules file, this example could be:

ifeq ($(shell dpkg-vendor --derives-from Ubuntu && echo yes),yes)
	SUBSTVARS = -Vdist:Depends="foo (>= 2)"
else
	SUBSTVARS = -Vdist:Depends="bar"
endif

%:
	dh $@

override_dh_gencontrol:
	dh_gencontrol -- $(SUBSTVARS)

If you use CDBS, it could be this:

include /usr/share/cdbs/1/rules/debhelper.mk
ifeq ($(shell dpkg-vendor --derives-from Ubuntu && echo yes),yes)
	DEB_DH_GENCONTROL_ARGS_ALL = -- -Vdist:Depends="foo (>= 2)"
else
	DEB_DH_GENCONTROL_ARGS_ALL = -- -Vdist:Depends="bar"
endif

Do you want to read more tutorials like this one? Click here to subscribe to my free newsletter, you can opt to receive future articles by email.

How to create Debian packages with alternative compression methods

While gzip is the standard Unix tool when it comes to compression, there are other tools available and some of them are performing better than gzip in terms of compression ratio. This article will explain where you can make use of them in your Debian packaging work.

In the source package

A source package is composed of multiple files. The .dsc file is always uncompressed and it’s fine since it’s a small textual file. The upstream tarballs can be compressed with gzip (orig.tar.gz), bzip2 (orig.tar.bz2), lzma (orig.tar.lzma) or xz (orig.tar.xz), so choose the one that you want if upstream provides the tarball compressed with multiple tools. Put it at the right place and dpkg-source will automatically use it. Note however that packages using source format “1.0” are restricted to gzip, and the main Debian archive currently only allows gzip and bzip2 (xz might be allowed later) even if the source format “3.0 (quilt)” supports all of them.

The debian packaging files are provided either in a .diff.gz file for source format “1.0” (again only gzip is supported) or in a .debian.tar file for source format “3.0 (quilt)”. The latter tarball can be compressed with the tool of your choice, you just have to tell dpkg-source which one to use (see below, note that gzip is the default).

In a native package, dpkg-source must generate the main tarball and you can instruct it to use another tool than gzip with the --compression option. That option is usually put in debian/source/options:

# Use bzip2 instead of gzip
compression = "bzip2"
compression-level = 9

For “3.0 (quilt)” source packages, this option is not very useful as the debian tarball that gets compressed is usually not very large. But some maintainers like to use the same compression tool for the upstream tarball and the debian tarball, so you can use this option to harmonize both.

In native packages, it’s much more interesting: for instance the size of dpkg’s source package has been reduced of 30% by switching to bzip2, saving 2Mb of disk.

In the binary packages

.deb files also contain compressed tar archives and by default they use gzip as well:

$ ar t dpkg_1.15.9_i386.deb 
debian-binary
control.tar.gz
data.tar.gz

data.tar.gz is the archive that contains all the files to be installed and it’s the one that you can compress with another tool if you want. Again this is mostly interesting for (very) large packages where the size difference clearly justifies deviating from the default compression tool. Try it out and see how many megabytes you can shove. Another aspect that you must keep in mind is that those alternative tools might use important amount of memory to do their job, both for compression and decompression. So if your package is meant to be installed on embedded platforms, or if you want to build your package on low-end hardware with few memory, you might want to stick with gzip.

Now how do you change the compression tool? Easy, dpkg-deb supports a -Z option, so you just have to pass “-Zbzip2″ for example. You can also pass “-z6″ for example to change the compression level to 6 (it’s interesting because a lower compression level might require less memory depending on the tool used). The dpkg-deb invocation is typically hidden behind the call to dh_builddeb in your debian/rules so you have to replace that invocation with “dh_builddeb -- -Zbzip2“.

If you are using a debhelper 7 tiny rules files, you have to add an override like in this example:

%:
	dh $@

override_dh_builddeb:
	dh_builddeb -- -Zbzip2

If you are using CDBS, you have to set the variable DEB_DH_BUILDDEB_ARGS:

include /usr/share/cdbs/1/rules/debhelper.mk
[...]
DEB_DH_BUILDDEB_ARGS = -- -Zbzip2

I hope you found this article helpful. Follow me on identi.ca or on twitter.

How to customize dpkg-source’s behaviour in your Debian source package

dpkg-source is the program that generates the Debian source package when a new package version is built. It offers many interesting command-line options but they are often not used because people don’t know how to ensure that they are used every time the package is built. Let’s fill that gap!

It is possible to forward some options to dpkg-source by typing them on the dpkg-buildpackage command line but you’d have to remember to type them every time. You could create a shell alias to avoid typing them but then you can’t have different options for different packages. Not very practical.

The proper solution has been implemented last year (in dpkg 1.15.5). It is now possible to put options in debian/source/options. Any long option (those starting with “--“) can be put in that file, one option per line with the leading “--” stripped.

Here’s an example:

# Bzip2 compression for debian.tar
compression = "bzip2"
compression-level = 7
# Do not generate diff for changes in config.(sub|guess)
extend-diff-ignore = "(^|/)config.(sub|guess)$"

Notice that spaces around the equal sign are possible contrary on the command line. You can use quotes around the value but it’s not required.

The debian/source/options file is part of the source package so if someone else grabs the resulting source package and rebuilds everything, they will use the options that you defined in that file.

You can also use debian/source/local-options but this time the file will not be included in the resulting source package. This is interesting for options that you want to use when you build from the VCS (Version Control Repository, aka git/svn/bzr/etc.) but that people downloading the resulting source package should not have. Some options (like --unapply-patches) are only allowed in that file to ensure a consistent experience for users of source packages.

You can learn more about the existing options in the dpkg-source manual page. Read it, I’m sure you’ll learn something. Did you know that you can tell dpkg-source to abort if you have upstream changes not managed by an existing patch in debian/patches? It’s --abort-on-upstream-changes and it’s only allowed in debian/source/local-options.

Be sure to subscribe to the RSS feed or to the email newsletter to not miss useful documentation for Debian contributors!