My Free Software Activities in March 2015

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 15.25 hours on Debian LTS. In that time I did the following:

  • CVE triage: I pushed 37 commits to the security tracker and contacted 20 maintainers about security issues affecting their packages.
  • I started a small helper script based on the new JSON output of the security tracker (see #761859 for details). It’s not ready yet but will make it easier to detect issues where the LTS team lags behind the security team, and other divergences like this and will speed up future CVE triage work (once done).
  • I sent DLA-174-1 (tcpdump update fixing 3 CVE) after having received a debdiff from the Romain Françoise.
  • I prepared DLA-175-1 on gnupg, fixing 3 CVE.
  • I prepared DLA-180-1 on gnutls26, fixing 3 CVE.

That’s it for the paid work. But still about LTS, I proposed two events for Debconf 15:

A Debian LTS logoIn my last Freexian LTS report, I mentioned briefly that it would be nice to have a logo for the LTS project. Shortly after I got a first logo prepared by Damien Escoffier and a few more followed: they are available on a wiki page (and the logo you see above is from him!). Following a suggestion of Paul Wise, I registered the logo request on another wiki page dedicated to artwork requests. That kind of collaboration is awesome! Thanks to all the artists involved in Debian.

Debian packaging

Django. This month has seen no less than 3 upstream point releases packaged for Debian (1.7.5, 1.7.6 and 1.7.7) and they have been accepted by the release team into Jessie. I’m pleased with this tolerance as I have argued the case for it multiple times in the past given the sane upstream release policy (bugfix only in a given released branch).

Python code analysis. I discovered a few months ago a tool combining the power of multiple Python code analysis tools: it’s prospector. I just filed a “Request for Package” for it (see #781165) and someone already volunteered to package it, yay \o/

update-rc.d and systemd. While working on a Kali version based on Jessie, I got hit by what boils down to a poor interaction between systemd and update-rc.d (see #746580) and after some exchanges with other affected users I raised the severity to serious as we really ought to do something about it before release. I also opened #781155 on openbsd-inetd as its usage of inetd.service instead of openbsd-inetd.service (which is only provided as a symlink to the former) leads to multiple small issues.

Misc

Debian France. The general assembly is over and the new board elected its new president: it’s now official, I’m no longer Debian France’s president. Good luck to Nicolas Dandrimont who took on this responsibility.

Salt’s openssh formula. I improved salt’s openssh formula to make it possible to manage the /etc/ssh/ssh_known_hosts file referencing the public SSH keys of other managed minions.

Tendenci.com. I was looking for a free software solution to handle membership management of a large NPO and I discovered Tendenci. It looked very interesting feature wise and written with a language/framework that I enjoy (Python/Django). But while it’s free software, there’s no community at all. The company that wrote it released it under a free software license and it really looks like that they did intend to build a community but they failed at it. When I looked their “development forums” were web-based and mostly empty with only initial discussion of the current developers and no reply from anybody… there’s also no mention of an IRC channel or a mailing list. I sent them a mail to see what kind of collaboration we could expect if we opted for their software and got no reply. A pity, really.

What free software membership management solution would you use when you have more than 10000 members to handle and when you want to use the underlying database to offer SSO authentication to multiple external services?

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

My Free Software Activities in February 2015

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 14.5 hours on Debian LTS. I worked mostly on CVE triage (41 commits in the security tracker) and organizational issues. One maintainer complained that he had not been kept in the loop for an LTS update of his package. After some discussion, I decided to change the way I did CVE triage so that any time that I add a package to our list of packages needing an update, I also send a mail to the maintainer, thus offering him the opportunity to step in.

To make this sustainable, I wrote a small helper script that will generate a mail out of a template. And to kickstart the process I mailed all maintainers of packages that were already listed in our queue of packages to update.

To improve the email generated, I requested a JSON export of the security tracker data (see discussions in #761859). In the mean time, Holger worked on this already and after a few iterations we did converge on an output format that will be really useful both for my needs in terms of CVE triage but also for the Package Tracker to be able to display the list of security vulnerabilities affecting each release (see #761730).

Last but not least, I don’t want to be the only one doing CVE triage for our LTS release so I documented the process in our wiki page.

As a side note, I sponsored an e2fsprogs update prepared by Nguyen Cong and I sent the DLA for the embargoed samba update that had been prepared by Ivo de Decker (thanks to both of them!).

Tryton

Like last month, I invested again a copious amount of time on Tryton, fixing some bugs that were affecting me and improving the French chart of accounts to properly manage purchases and sales within the European Union. Here are some links for more details:

Debian

I did some work on Distro Tracker, I fixed #777453 (password reset not working because the generated email was using an invalid From email) and #779247 (obsolete build reproducibility action items were not dropped). I also started to work on restructuring the mail handling in distro-tracker (cf #754913) but it’s not public yet.

While I have no plans to stop contributing to Debian (it’s part of my day job!), I reduced my non-work related involvement by officially recognizing that I was no longer properly assuming some of my responsibilities and that I was following too many mailing lists and RSS feeds. The most notable changes are that I removed myself from the maintenance of dpkg, developers-reference, quilt, sql-ledger, and a few perl/python modules.

Misc

Voting software. Part of the reason why I’m reducing my involvement in Debian is that I got more involved in Nouvelle Donne (a French political party) and in particular in the handling of its digital infrastructure (currently running on Ubuntu, doh!). As part of this, I was looking for free software to handle secure votes and elections (and if possible adhering to the principles of liquid democracy). There’s no perfect solution and no clear winner.

That said I started following the evolution of AgoraVoting because it seems to have a good momentum and has some interesting features (it already supports votes with ranked choices, supports good crypto, has been used for elections involving large numbers of voters in the context of Podemos in Spain). But it still has some ways to go to establish itself as a truly international and community-backed project.

GDM bug. Due to my work on Kali, I filed a bug against GDM (this one has been quickly fixed upstream, it’s still open in Debian) and another one against accountsservice to request the possibility to define the default graphical session.

Dirvish formula for Salt. I contributed another formula to manage backups with dirvish.

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

My Free Software Activities for January 2015

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 12 hours on Debian LTS. I did the following tasks:

  • CVE triage. I pushed 24 commits to the securitry tracker. I spent more time on this task than usually (see details below).
  • I released DLA-143-1 on python-django (fixing 3 CVE). While I expected the update to be quick, my testing revealed that even though the patches applied mostly fine, they did not work as expected. I ended up spending almost 4 hours to properly backport the fixes and the corresponding tests (to ensure that the fixes are working properly).

I want to expand on two cases that I stumbled upon in my CVE triage work and that took quite long to investigate each. While my after-the-fact description is rather straightforward, the real process involved more iterations and data gathering that I do not mention here.

First I was investigating CVE-2012-6685 on libnokogiri-ruby and the upstream bug discussion revealed that libxml2 could also be part of the problem. Using the tests cases submitted there, I confirmed that libxml2 was also affected by an issue of its own… then I started to analyze the history of CVE of libxml2 to find out whether that issue got a CVE assigned: yes, that was CVE-2014-0191 (although the CVE description is unrelated). But this CVE was marked as fixed in all releases. Why? It turns out that the upstream fix for this CVE is just the complement of another commit that was merged way earlier (and that was used as a basis for the commit as the copy/paste of the comment shows). When the security teams integrated the upstream patch in wheezy/squeeze, they were probably not aware that a full fix required to also include something else. In the end, I thus reopened CVE-2014-0191 on our tracker (commit here).

The second problematic case was pound. Thijs Kinkhorst added pound related data on the multiple (high profile) SSL related issues. So it appeared on my radar of new vulnerable package in Squeeze because it was marked that CVE-2009-3555 was fixed in version 2.6-2 while Squeeze has 2.5-1. There was no bug reference in the security tracker and the Debian changelog for that version only mentioned an “anti_beast patch” which is yet another issue (CVE-2011-3389). I had to dig a bit deeper… in the end I discovered that the above patch also has provisions for the CVE that was of interest to me, except that Brian May recently reported in #765649 that the package was still vulnerable to this issue… I tried to understand where the above patch was failing and thus submitted my findings to the bug. And I updated the tracker data with my newly gained knowledge (commit 31751 and 31752).

Tryton

For me, January is always the month where I try to close the accounting books of Freexian. This year is no exception except that it’s the first year where I do this with Tryton. I first upgraded to Tryton 3.4 to have the latest version.

Despite this I discovered multiple problems while doing so… since I don’t want to have those problems next year, I reported them and prepared fixes for those related to the French chart of accounts:

  • #4464: CSV export on tree views is unusable
  • #4466: add missing deferral properties on accounts
  • #4468: drop abusive reconcile properties on some accounts
  • #4469: convert account 6354 into a real non-view account
  • #4479: balance non-deferral accounts is broken with non-view parent accounts

Saltstack

I mentioned this idea last month… setting up and maintaining a lot of sbuild chroots can be tiresome so I wanted to automate this as much as possible. To achieve this I created three Salt formulas and got them added to the official Saltstack repository:

Each one builds on top of the former. debootstrap-formula creates chroots with debootstrap or cdebootstrap. schroot-formula does the same and registers those chroots in schroot. And sbuild-formula does the same as schroot-formula but with different defaults that are more suited to sbuild chroots (and obviously ensures that sbuild is installed and that generated chroots are buildd chroots).

With the sbuild formula I can put this in pillar data:

sbuild:
  chroots:
    wheezy:
      architectures: [amd64, i386]
      extra_dists:
        - wheezy-backports
        - wheezy-security
      extra_aliases:
        - wheezy-backports
        - stable-security
        - wheezy-security
    jessie:
    [...]

And then a simple salt-call state.highstate (I’m running in standalone mode) will ensure that I have all the chroots properly setup.

Misc packaging

I packaged new upstream releases of Django in experimental and opened a pre-approval request to get the latest 1.7.x in jessie (#775892). It seems to be a difficult sell for the release team, which is a pity because we have active Debian developers, active upstream developers, and everybody is well aware of the no-new features rule to avoid regressions. Where is the risk?

I also filed an unblock request for Dolibarr (on the request of the security team which wants to see the CVE fix reach Jessie). I did small contributions to two bugs that were of special interest to some of my donators (#751339 and #774811), they were not under my responsibility but I tried to get them moving by pinging the relevant people.

I prepared a security upload for Django in Wheezy (python-django_1.4.5-1+deb7u9) and sent it to the security team. While doing this I discovered a small problem in their backported patch that I reported upstream in Django’s ticket #24239.

Debian France

With the new year, it’s again time to organize a general assembly with the election of a third of its board. So we solicited candidacies among the members and I’m pleased to see that we got 6 candidacies for the 3 seats. It’s a good sign that we still have enough persons caring about the association. One of them is even speaking of Debconf 17 in France… great plans!

On my side, I announced that I would not candidate to be president for the next year. I will stay on the board though to ensure we have a smooth transition.

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

My Free Software Activities for December 2014

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 20 hours on Debian LTS. I did the following tasks:

  • CVE triage: I pushed 47 commits to the security tracker this month. Due to this, I submitted two wishlist bugs against the security tracker: #772927 and #772961.
  • I released DLA-106-1 which had been prepared by Osamu Aoki.
  • I released DLA-111-1 fixing one CVE on cpio.
  • I released DLA-113-1 and DLA-114-1 on bsd-mailx/heirloom-mailx fixing one CVE for the former and two CVE for the latter.
  • I released DLA-120-1 on xorg-server. This update alone took more than 6h to backport all the patches, fixing a massive set of 12 CVE.

Not in the paid hours, but still related to Debian LTS, I kindly asked Linux Weekly News to cover Debian LTS in their security page and this is now live. You will see DLA on the usual security page and there’s also a dedicated page tracking this: http://lwn.net/Alerts/Debian-LTS/

I modified the LTS wiki page to have a dedicated Funding sub-page. This avoids having a direct link to Freexian’s offer on the main LTS page (which surprised a few persons) and allows to give some more background information and makes it possible for other persons/companies to also get listed in the same way (since there’s no exclusive relationship between Debian and Freexian here!).

And I also answered some questions of Nguyen Cong (a new LTS contributor, employed by Toshiba with explicit permission to contribute to LTS during work hours! \o/), on IRC, on ask.debian.net (again) and on the mailing list! It’s great to see the LTS project expanding beyond current members of the Debian project.

Distro Tracker

I want to give again some more priority to Distro Tracker at least to complete the transition from the old PTS to this new service… last month has been a bit better than November but not by much.

I reviewed a patch in #771604 (about displaying long descriptions), I merged another patch in #757443 (fixing bad markup which rendered the page unusable with Konqueror), I fixed #760382 where package gone through NEW would never lose their version in NEW.

Kali related contributions

I’m not covering my Kali work here but only some things which got contributed upstream (or to Debian).

First I ensured that we could build the Kali ISO with live-build 4.x in jessie. This resulted in multiple patches merged to the Debian live project (1 2 3 4). I also submitted a patch for a regression in the handling of conditionals in package lists, it got dropped and has been fixed differently instead. I also filed #772651 to report a problem in how live-build decided of the variant of the live-config package to install.

Kali has forked the sysvinit package to be able to disable the services by default and I was investigating how to port this feature in the new systemd world. It turns out systemd has such a feature natively: it’s called Preset files. Unfortunately it’s not usable in Debian because Debian does not call systemctl preset during package installation. I filed bug #772555 to get this fixed (in Stretch, it’s too late for Jessie :-().

Saltstack

I’m using salt to automate some administration task in Kali, at home and at work. I discovered recently that the project tries to collect “Salt Formulas”: those are ready to use instructions for as many services as possibles.

I started using this for some simple services and quickly felt the need to extend “salt-formula”, the set of states used to configure salt with salt. I submitted 5 pull requests (#73 and #74 to configure salt in standalone mode, #75 to enable the upstream package repositories, #76 to automatically download and enable the desired salt formulas, #77 for some bugfixes) and they have all been merged in less than 24 hours (that’s the kind of thing that motivates you to contribute again in the future!).

I also submitted a bug fix for samba-formula and a bug report in salt itself (#19180).

BTW I have some salt states to setup schroot and sbuild. I will try to package those as proper salt formulas in the future…

Misc stuff

Mailing list governance. In Debian, we often complain about meta-discussion on mailing lists (i.e. discussions about how we discuss together) and at the same time we need to have that kind of discussions from time to time. So I suggested to host those discussions in a new mailing list and to get this new list setup, our rules require to have other people interested in having this list. The idea had some support when we discussed it on debian-private, so I relaunched it on debian-project while filing the official request in the BTS: #772645. Unfortunately, I only got one second. So if you’re interested in pursuing this idea, speak up now…

Sponsorship. I sponsored another Galette plugin this month: galette-plugin-fullcard. Thanks to François-Régis Vuillemin for his work.

Publican. Following one of my bug report against Publican and with the help of the upstream author, we identified the problem and I submitted a patch.

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

My Free Software Activities in November 2014

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 18 hours on Debian LTS (14h allocated by Freexian + 4h I did not spend last month). I did the following tasks:

  • CVE triage: I pushed 19 commits to the security tracker. I also tried to encourage some maintainers to provide security updates for packages that are not in use by the current LTS sponsors and that are thus not in our priority list.
  • DLA 87: dbus update fixing 3 CVE
  • DLA 93: libgcrypt11 update fixing 1 CVE
  • DLA 96: openjdk-6 security update fixing 21 CVE
  • Worked on preparing a security update to linux. It’s not released yet.

Updating the linux source package took a good half of the allocated time. We opted to update the kernel to the upstream version 2.6.32.64. I integrated the upstream patches and identified about 130 patches that we had to disable (because they were already integrated upstream). Then I updated our “openvz flavor” patch to apply on top of the new kernel. This required quite a bit of manual conflict resolution and there are even parts where I was not sure that I took the correct decision. I was not able to find an upstream openvz git tree on this kernel version to to double check.

Instead I asked Ben Hutchings to review my patch. He told me that he did not volunteer to work on LTS, but that he would be open to contribute to it for money. Following this remark, as the coordinator of Freexian’s offer, I offered him to join to the set of paid LTS contributors to take care of the kernel and he accepted.

So hopefully we will be able to wrap this linux upload in the first week of december. We had no uploads of the kernel in Squeeze since July so it’s good to know that we now have someone who will be able to handle it in priority.

Distro Tracker

No new developments this month. Instead I spent some time to import old historic news so that when you lookup removed packages you have some actual content instead of a 404 error. For example you can look at python2.1.

Another thing that I did is to tag some bugs with the newly-announced tag “newcomer”. Those are easy bugs that are ideal targets for new contributors who’d like to get started: here’s the list. It’s up to you now! 😉

DEP-14: Recommended layout for Git packaging repositories

I have drafted an initial version of a document called Recommended layout for Git packaging repositories and submitted it for discussion on debian-devel.

The discussion has been interesting and constructive (yes this is still possible in Debian!). I have a bunch of improvements in my local copy and needs to process a few more feedback before submitting an updated draft. It’s not a revolution but it’s a good step to try to standardize tags and branches naming conventions.

Systemd, the tech-ctte and our mailing lists

As an old-timer, I care a lot about the governance of Debian and it’s annoying to see how the systemd debate brought back some of our old daemons in terms of hostile atmosphere on our mailing lists.

We can disagree on a lot of things, but we must respect each other and we are here to work together on solutions for everybody. As such I wrote to the persons who cross the line to invite them to behave better. And I’m glad that our listmasters are backing up our calls with bans when appropriate. I believe we must go further in that direction and I shared an idea (on a debian-private thread that should have never existed, much like most of the traffic on that list) that I shall formalize and share on debian-project@l.d.o at some point.

At the same time, we also had another governance-related discussion with the idea to impose some turnover in the technical committee. I’m glad to see that we will soon vote on this topic. This is a good thing in general even though we just had 3 tech-ctte members who retired.

Misc stuff

I sponsored an upload of galette and of 3 of its plugins. I reviewed jitsi-videobridge and jitsi-meet on mentors.debian.net.

I filed a few bugs:

  • #768256 about huge vim icons in the GNOME contextual menus
  • #768540: cdebootstrap: fails to bootstrap old releases with dpkg not supporting data.tar.xz
  • #770011: lynx -dump badly converting …

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

My Free Software Activities in October 2014

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Packaging work

With the Jessie freeze approaching, I took care of packaging some new upstream releases that I wanted to get in. I started with zim 0.62, I had skipped 0.61 due to some annoying regressions. Since I had two bugs to forward, I took the opportunity to reach out to the upstream author to see if he had some important fixes to get into Jessie. This resulted in me pushing another update with 3 commits cherry picked from the upstream VCS. I also sponsored a wheezy-backports of the new version.

I pushed two new bugfixes releases of Publican (4.2.3 and 4.2.6) but I had to include a work-around for a bug that I reported earlier on docbook-xml (#763598: the XML catalog doesn’t allow libxml2/xmllint to identify the local copy of some entities files) and that is unlikely to be fixed in time for Jessie.

Last but not least, I pushed the first point release of Django 1.7, aka version 1.7.1 to unstable and asked release managers to ensure it migrates to testing before the real freeze. This is important because the closer we are to upstream, the easier it is to apply security patches during the lifetime of Jessie (which will hopefully be 5 years, thanks to Debian LTS!). I also released a backport of python-django 1.7 to wheezy-backports.

I sponsored galette 0.7.8+dfsg-1 fixing an RC bug so that it can get back to testing (it got removed from testing due to the bug).

Debian LTS

See my dedicated report for the paid work I did on that area. Apart from that, I took some time to get in touch with all the Debian consultants and see if they knew some companies to reach out. There are a few new sponsors in the pipe thanks to this, but given the large set of people that it represents, I was expecting more. I used this opportunity to report all bogus entries (i.e bouncing email, broken URL) to the maintainer of the said webpage.

Distro Tracker

Only 30 commits this month, with almost no external contribution, I’m a bit saddened by this situation because it’s not very difficult to contribute to this project and we have plenty of easy bugs to get you started.

That said I’m still happy with the work done. Most of the changes have been made for Kali but will be useful for all derivatives: it’s now possible to add external repositories in the tracker and not display them in the list of available versions, and not generate automatic news about those repositories. There’s a new “derivative” application which is only in its infancy but can already provide a useful comparison of a derivative with its parent. See it in action on the Kali Package Tracker: http://pkg.kali.org/derivative/ Thanks to Offensive Security which is sponsoring this work!

Since I have pushed Django 1.7 to wheezy-backports, all distro tracker instances that I manage are now running that version of Django and I opted to make that version mandatory. This made it possible to add initial Django migrations and rely on this new feature for future database schema upgrade (I have voluntarily avoided schema change up to now to avoid problems migrating from South to Django migrations).

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

My Debian LTS report for October 2014

During October, I spent 10 hours on paid LTS work. I should have worked 4 hours more, but for various reasons this did not happen. Instead I’ll spend 4 more hours in November.

During this time, I did the following:

  • CVE triage: this month I pushed 23 commits to the security tracker SVN repository, and filed #765352 against wpa.
  • I released a mysql-5.1 update (DLA-75-1) fixing 3 CVE.
  • I sponsored the upload of ppp 2.4.5-4+deb6u1 for DLA-74-1 which had been prepared by Andrew Bartlett.
  • I uploaded a new version of apache2 (DLA-71-1) fixing 2 CVE.
  • I filed a few bugs against debian-security-support to request that some packages be marked as unsupported in squeeze: #765374 for axis2c and
    rampart, #765452 for a new feature allowing binary packages to be marked as unsupported so that glassfish-appserv can be marked as such (this is #765454).

After a few months of work on LTS, I’m starting to have a better grasp on the worflow and on what can be done or not. But I’m still astonished that we have so few squeeze users on the mailing list. If you’re using Squeeze, please subscribe to the list and test the packages that contributors are submitting for tests/validation. It really helps to have some feedback from real users before releasing an update, in particular when the Debian contributor who prepared the update is not a user of said package… not everybody has the skills required to prepare security updates, but everybody can help test packages, you have no excuses. 😉

And we still need more organizations joining the LTS project, either by providing help (like Catalyst did by letting Andrew Bartlett work on LTS, thanks to them!) or by sponsoring the
project
and letting others do the work.

My Free Software Activities in September 2014

This is my monthly summary of my free software related activities. If you’re among the people who made a donation to support my work (26.6 €, thanks everybody!), then you can learn how I spent your money. Otherwise it’s just an interesting status update on my various projects.

Django 1.7

Since Django 1.7 got released early September, I updated the package in experimental and continued to push for its inclusion in unstable. I sent a few more patches to multiple reverse build dependencies who had asked for help (python-django-bootstrap-form, horizon, lava-server) and then sent the package to unstable. At that time, I bumped the severity of all bug filed against packages that were no longer building with Django 1.7.

Later in the month, I made sure that the package migrated to testing, it only required a temporary removal of mumble-django (see #763087). Quite a few packages got updated since then (remaining bugs here).

Debian Long Term Support

I have worked towards keeping Debian Squeeze secure, see the dedicated article: My Debian LTS report for September 2014.

Distro Tracker

The pace of development on tracker.debian.org slowed down a bit this month, with only 30 new commits in the repository, closing 6 bugs. Some of the changes are noteworthy though: the news now contain true links on bugs, CVE and plain URLs (example here). I have also fixed a serious issue with the way users were identified when they used their Alioth account credentials to login via sso.debian.org.

On the development side, we’re now able to generate the test suite code coverage which is quite helpful to identify parts of the code that are clearly missing some tests (see bin/gen-coverage.sh in the repository).

Misc packaging

Publican. I have been behind packaging new upstream versions of Publican and with the freeze approaching, I decided to take care of it. Unfortunately, it wasn’t as easy as I had hoped and found numerous issues that I have filed upstream (invalid public identifier, PDF build fails with noNumberLines function available, build of the manual requires the network). Most of those have been fixed upstream in the mean time but the last issue seems to be a problem in the way we manage our Docbook XML catalogs in Debian. I have thus filed #763598 (docbook-xml: xmllint fails to identify local copy of docbook entities file) which is still waiting an answer from the maintainer.

Package sponsorship. I have sponsored new uploads of dolibarr (RC bug fix), tcpdf (RC bug fix), tryton-server (security update) and django-ratelimit.

GNOME 3.14. With the arrival of GNOME 3.14 in unstable, I took care of updating gnome-shell-timer and also filed some tickets for extensions that I use: https://github.com/projecthamster/shell-extension/issues/79 and https://github.com/olebowle/gnome-shell-timer/issues/25

git-buildpackage. I filed multiple bugs on git-buildpackage for little issues that have been irking me since I started using this tool: #761160 (gbp pq export/switch should be smarter), #761161 (gbp pq import+export should preserve patch filenames), #761641 (gbp import-orig should be less fragile and more idempotent).

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

My Debian LTS report for September

Thanks to the sponsorship of multiple companies, I have been paid to work 11 hours on Debian LTS this month.

CVE triagingI started by doing lots of triage in the security tracker (if you want to help, instructions are here) because I noticed that the dla-needed.txt list (which contains the list of packages that must be taken care of via an LTS security update) was missing quite a few packages that had open vulnerabilities in oldstable.

In the end, I pushed 23 commits to the security tracker. I won’t list the details each time but for once, it’s interesting to let you know the kind of things that this work entailed:

  • I reviewed the patches for CVE-2014-0231, CVE-2014-0226, CVE-2014-0118, CVE-2013-5704 and confirmed that they all affected the version of apache2 that we have in Squeeze. I thus added apache2 to dla-needed.txt.
  • I reviewed CVE-2014-6610 concerning asterisk and marked the version in Squeeze as not affected since the file with the vulnerability doesn’t exist in that version (this entails some checking that the specific feature is not implemented in some other file due to file reorganization or similar internal changes).
  • I reviewed CVE-2014-3596 and corrected the entry that said that is was fixed in unstable. I confirmed that the versions in squeeze was affected and added it to dla-needed.txt.
  • Same story for CVE-2012-6153 affecting commons-httpclient.
  • I reviewed CVE-2012-5351 and added a link to the upstream ticket.
  • I reviewed CVE-2014-4946 and CVE-2014-4945 for php-horde-imp/horde3, added links to upstream patches and marked the version in squeeze as unaffected since those concern javascript files that are not in the version in squeeze.
  • I reviewed CVE-2012-3155 affecting glassfish and was really annoyed by the lack of detailed information. I thus started a discussion on debian-lts to see whether this package should not be marked as unsupported security wise. It looks like we’re going to mark a single binary packages as unsupported… the one containing the application server with the vulnerabilities, the rest is still needed to build multiple java packages.
  • I reviewed many CVE on dbus, drupal6, eglibc, kde4libs, libplack-perl, mysql-5.1, ppp, squid and fckeditor and added those packages to dla-needed.txt.
  • I reviewed CVE-2011-5244 and CVE-2011-0433 concerning evince and came to the conclusion that those had already been fixed in the upload 2.30.3-2+squeeze1. I marked them as fixed.
  • I droppped graphicsmagick from dla-needed.txt because the only CVE affecting had been marked as no-dsa (meaning that we don’t estimate that a security updated is needed, usually because the problem is minor and/or that fixing it has more chances to introduce a regression than to help).
  • I filed a few bugs when those were missing: #762789 on ppp, #762444 on axis.
  • I marked a bunch of CVE concerning qemu-kvm and xen as end-of-life in Squeeze since those packages are not currently supported in Debian LTS.
  • I reviewed CVE-2012-3541 and since the whole report is not very clear I mailed the upstream author. This discussion led me to mark the bug as no-dsa as the impact seems to be limited to some information disclosure. I invited the upstream author to continue the discussion on RedHat’s bugzilla entry.

And when I say “I reviewed” it’s a simplification for this kind of process:

  • Look up for a clear explanation of the security issue, for a list of vulnerable versions, and for patches for the versions we have in Debian in the following places:
    • The Debian security tracker CVE page.
    • The associated Debian bug tracker entry (if any).
    • The description of the CVE on cve.mitre.org and the pages linked from there.
    • RedHat’s bugzilla entry for the CVE (which often implies downloading source RPM from CentOS to extract the patch they used).
    • The upstream git repository and sometimes the dedicated security pages on the upstream website.
  • When that was not enough to be conclusive for the version we have in Debian (and unfortunately, it’s often the case), download the Debian source package and look at the source code to verify if the problematic code (assuming that we can identify it based on the patch we have for newer versions) is also present in the old version that we are shipping.

CVE triaging is often almost half the work in the general process: once you know that you are affected and that you have a patch, the process to release an update is relatively straightforward (sometimes there’s still work to do to backport the patch).

Once I was over that first pass of triaging, I had already spent more than the 11 hours paid but I still took care of preparing the security update for python-django. Thorsten Alteholz had started the work but got stuck in the process of backporting the patches. Since I’m co-maintainer of the package, I took over and finished the work to release it as DLA-65-1.

My Free Software Activities in August 2014

This is my monthly summary of my free software related activities. If you’re among the people who made a donation to support my work (65.55 €, thanks everybody!), then you can learn how I spent your money. Otherwise it’s just an interesting status update on my various projects.

Distro Tracker

Even though I was officially in vacation during 3 of the 4 weeks of August, I spent many nights working on Distro Tracker. I’m pleased to have managed to bring back Python 3 compatibility over all the (tested) code base. The full test suite now passes with Python 3.4 and Django 1.6 (or 1.7).

From now on, I’ll run “tox” on all code submitted to make sure that we won’t regress on this point. tox also runs flake8 for me so that I can easily detect when the submitted code doesn’t respect the PEP8 coding style. It also catches other interesting mistakes (like unused variable or too complex functions).

Getting the code to pass flake8 was also a major effort, it resulted in a huge commit (89 files changed, 1763 insertions, 1176 deletions).

Thanks to the extensive test suite, all those refactoring only resulted in two regressions that I fixed rather quickly.

Some statistics: 51 commits over the last month, 41 by me, 3 by Andrew Starr-Bochicchio, 3 by Christophe Siraut, 3 by Joseph Herlant and 1 by Simon Kainz. Thanks to all of them! Their contributions ported some features that were already available on the old PTS. The new PTS is now warning of upcoming auto-removals, is displaying problems with uptream URLs, includes a short package description in the page title, and provides a link to screenshots (if they exist on screenshots.debian.net).

We still have plenty of bugs to handle, so you can help too: check out https://tracker.debian.org/docs/contributing.html. I always leave easy bugs for others to handle, so grab one and get started! I’ll review your patch with pleasure. :-)

Tryton

After my last batch of contributions to Tryton’s French Chart of Accounts (#4108, #4109, #4110, #4111) Cédric Krier granted me commit rights to the account_fr mercurial module.

Debconf 14

I wasn’t able to attend this year but thanks to awesome work of the video team, I watched some videos (and I still have a bunch that I want to see). Some of them were put online the day after they had been recorded. Really amazing work!

Django 1.7

After the initial bug reports, I got some feedback of maintainers who feared that it would be difficult to get their packages working with Django 1.7. I helped them as best as I can by providing some patches (for horizon, for django-restricted-resource, for django-testscenarios).

Since I expected many maintainers to be not very pro-active, I rebuilt all packages with Django 1.7 to detect at least those that would fail to build. I tagged as confirmed all the corresponding bug reports.

Looking at https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/pkgreport.cgi?users=python-django@packages.debian.org;tag=django17, one can see that some progress has been made with 25 packages fixed. Still there are at least 25 others that are still problematic in sid and 35 that have not been investigated at all (except for the automatic rebuild that passed). Again your help is more than welcome!

It’s easy to install python-django 1.7 from experimental and they try to use/rebuild the packages from the above list.

Dpkg translation

With the freeze approaching, I wanted to ensure that dpkg was fully translated in French. I thus pinged debian-l10n-french@lists.debian.org and merged some translations that were done by volunteers. Unfortunately it looks like nobody really stepped up to maintain it in the long run… so I did myself the required update when dpkg 1.17.12 got uploaded.

Is there anyone willing to manage dpkg’s French translation? With the latest changes in 1.17.13, we have again a few untranslated strings:
$ for i in $(find . -name fr.po); do echo $i; msgfmt -c -o /dev/null --statistics $i; done
./po/fr.po
1083 translated messages, 4 fuzzy translations, 1 untranslated message.
./dselect/po/fr.po
268 translated messages, 3 fuzzy translations.
./scripts/po/fr.po
545 translated messages.
./man/po/fr.po
2277 translated messages, 8 fuzzy translations, 3 untranslated messages.

Misc stuff

I made an xsane QA upload (it’s currently orphaned) to drop the (build-)dependency on liblcms1 and avoid getting it removed from Debian testing (see #745524). For the record, how-can-i-help warned me of this after one dist-upgrade.

With the Django 1.7 work and the need to open up an experimental branch, I decided to switch python-django’s packaging to git even though the current team policy is to use subversion. This triggered (once more) the discussion about a possible switch to git and I was pleased to see more enthusiasm this time around. Barry Warsaw tested a few workflows, shared his feeling and pushed toward a live discussion of the switch during Debconf. It looks like it might happen for good this time. I contributed my share in the discussions on the mailing list.

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.